What is the first thing that comes to your mind when you hear the word “food intolerance”? My guess is that it is gluten intolerant.

Studies show that up to 20% of people think they have a problem with gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Many people blame intestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, abdominal distension, gas, indigestion, constipation, and diarrhea.

These are undeniably unpleasant symptoms and something is causing them — but is gluten the real cause?

Food manufacturers are certainly relying on this as they are expanding the scope of “free from” (and gluten-free is not cheap).

Still, gluten “intolerance” can be disagreeable, and some consider it simply an excuse for a noisy diet.

Studies show that up to 20% of people think they have a problem with gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Many people blame intestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain, abdominal distension, gas, indigestion, constipation, and diarrhea.

In fact, I wasn’t completely convinced either. But science (and therefore my view!) Has come a long way in the last decade. There is gluten intolerance, or non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity to give it its scientific name. However, it is still unclear what the exact cause and whether other ingredients of wheat are blamed as well as gluten.

But what we know is that gluten intolerance is much less common than reported. And you need to make sure this is what you have, because cutting gluten if you don’t need it can have unintended consequences.

Long-term food restrictions can be socially isolated. Removing the entire food group can also mean unknowingly reducing other nutrients in the diet.

A study of about 200,000 people at Harvard University in the United States found that those who consumed the most gluten had a 13% lower risk of type 2 diabetes than those who consumed the least. ..

This is partly because people on a gluten-free diet tended to eat less of the grain fiber that protects them from type 2 diabetes.

Another UK study reviewed more than 1,700 foods and found that, on average, gluten-free foods are likely to be low in fiber (a favorite nutrient for gut bacteria) and protein.

With this in mind, it’s not surprising that a gluten-free diet reduces gut bacteria, which are known to produce beneficial compounds that help control blood sugar levels and stimulate the immune system.

What we know is that gluten intolerance is much less common than reported.And you need to make sure this is what you have, because cutting gluten if you don't need it can have unintended consequences.

What we know is that gluten intolerance is much less common than reported.And you need to make sure this is what you have, because cutting gluten if you don’t need it can have unintended consequences.

So how do you know if you really have gluten intolerance? First of all — if symptoms include chronic fatigue, anemia, unexplained weight loss, stomatitis, or if you have type 1 diabetes, thyroid disease, or irritable bowel syndrome, your doctor will first check for celiac disease, autoimmune disease. It is recommended to do. Damages the intestines.

People with celiac disease should definitely avoid gluten. Even small breads containing gluten can damage gluten.

There is a simple blood test for this that the GP can do. It is imperative that you still eat a significant amount of gluten for at least 6 weeks before the test. Otherwise, no antibodies to celiac disease will be detected (the next step is a biopsy).

If you don’t have celiac disease but feel that gluten doesn’t suit you, you’ll ideally meet a nutritionist.

did you know?

Oats are gluten-free, but most are processed in the same place as gluten-containing grains, making them unsuitable for people on a gluten-free diet due to mutual contamination.

If that’s not possible, it’s worth trying my 4-day test protocol to better understand if it’s really gluten that’s causing the problem (more than in my book Eat Yourself Healthy). There is a comprehensive version).

This method of testing gluten intolerance, known as the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, is considered the gold standard method.

Unlike celiac disease, there is no simple blood, stool, or hair test for gluten intolerance, despite what Charlatan tries to market to you. It is not only my opinion, but also the advice of organizations such as the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

I use this protocol in my clinic and hundreds of clients have helped bring gluten-containing foods back to life. Keep in mind that people with a history of eating disorders should discuss with their doctor before restricting their diet.

First, all sources of gluten should be excluded from the diet for two weeks.

Not only bread, pasta and cakes containing wheat, but also unexpected things such as soy sauce and barley squash drinks contain gluten.

If the symptom is resolved, proceed to the test protocol below. If symptoms do not improve, reintroduce restricted foods and consult your GP or dietitian.

Gluten test

After avoiding gluten for two weeks, it’s time to reintroduce it. Include a test food (standard wheat bread slices or placebo (wheat or gluten-free bread)) daily for up to 4 days, then switch to another test food for more. Four days.

This is where friends and family need to disguise their food. So, for example, I don’t know if I’m getting a wheat bread or gluten-free version by blending, toasting, or crushing. Continue your gluten-free diet during this test period.

Day 1: Start with a slice of test food (I don’t know which one) with the meal.

Day 2: Evaluate symptoms. If so, wait a few days for them to subside and repeat with half the dose of the same test food.

If you are asymptomatic, include two slices of the same test food in your diet.

Day 3: Evaluate the symptoms again. If so, wait a few days for the symptoms to subside, then use another test food (that is, either wheat bread or placebo) and repeat the procedure from day one. There are no symptoms. Add 3 test foods to 2 meals.

Day 4: Evaluate bowel symptoms. If so, wait a few days for them to subside, then use other test foods and repeat the procedure from day one.

If you are asymptomatic, you can start day 1 immediately with other test foods.

After completing both test hoods, ask the “assistant” to clarify which test hood is which.

If your whole wheat bread is asymptomatic, you’re pretty sure it’s not due to gluten / wheat. Yay!

If you only get symptoms when you eat whole wheat bread, try adding two tablespoons of onions or half a garlic to your diet to see if it is another ingredient in the bread, fructans. This is the problem.

If you try onions and garlic and there are no symptoms, it indicates that you have non-celiac gluten hypersensitivity. Discuss this with your medical team.

If you also react to onions, garlic, or placebo, please wait for a while as there is not enough space here. Everything will be revealed in a future column.

Try this: 4 ways of dating

I like to think of dates as natural high fiber candy. The chewy sweetness makes you feel sweet. They are my go-to. Take one of Medjool’s dates, slice it vertically to remove the holes, and try one of the following paddings: (You can put the stuffed dates in the freezer and eat ready-to-use sweets all week long.)

Serve 1

Sweet and salty:

  • Half of sun-dried tomatoes, stored in oil

Seed’n’nut:

  • Choose 1 teaspoon nut butter
  • Mixed seed pinch, toast

Creamy tahini:

Chocolate nut:

  • Light rain of melted dark chocolate

askMegan

Eating whole grains and rye bread really confuses my gut. The same is true for whole grain pasta. There are no other symptoms. I’m 22

Henry, by email.

Both of these grains contain gluten, so for your safety it is advisable to ask your doctor about testing for celiac disease.

This includes a blood test (known as tTG) to check for antibodies. However, for this to be effective, continue to include gluten in at least two meals (aim for the equivalent of 4 slices of bread or 2 cups of pasta per day) for the previous 6-8 weeks. is needed.

If gluten has already been excised and reintroduced causing debilitating symptoms, there is a gene celiac blood test that looks for the human leukocyte antigens DQ2 and DQ8 genes. It doesn’t have to keep eating gluten.

If this is positive, you should reintroduce gluten into your diet and do a tTG test before making a diagnosis. If you don’t have celiac disease, try adding these grains to your diet in half the normal amount. If you tolerate this better, your gut may be wrestling with another component of these grains called fructans.

These are generally beneficial as they nourish the gut bacteria. Therefore, do not cut them out. However, reduce the amount you consume each time you sit while healing your intestines.

Contact Dr. Megan Rossi

Send an email to drmegan@dailymail.co.uk or send an email to Good Health, Daily Mail, 2 Derry Street, London W8 5TT — include contact details. Dr. Megan Rossi is unable to communicate personally. Reply should be done in general circumstances. If you have any health concerns, be sure to talk to your doctor.

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